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Action Zone (€5)

A special board game with a focus on Epilpesy. Who can collect the most tokens before reaching the brain?! 

Educating for a better understanding of epilepsy.

Aim of the game – To be the player/team who has the most tokens and NOT to be the first player/team to finish, therefore gaining valuable information about epilepsy.

2 or more players – 5 years and up.

 

My Lights Go Out (€8)

My Lights Go Out is a story about a little girl called Aoife. Aoife is 4 years old and has two brothers Sean and Pádraig and a dog named Sky.

One day Aoife experiences a seizure and the story explains the journey of what happens when a child is diagnosed with epilepsy. It is written as a simple starting point to explain epilepsy for young children.

Written by Julie Greene with beautiful colour illustrations by Margaret Anne Suggs. Copies are available from selected Epilepsy Ireland offices nationwide for €8 per copy.

Safety Pillow (€22) (1 & 3 year members discount)

Seizures occurring during sleep are qualitatively different from seizures which may happen when one is awake. However, due to the context in which they may occur it is advisable to avoid soft pillows which can cause breathing to be obstructed if the person turns their face into the pillow during the seizure. The price per pillow is €22.00 including postage within Ireland, for outside Ireland, postal rates will cost more, call 01 4557500 to enquire for prices. 

Safety Pillow (€40)

Seizures occurring during sleep are qualitatively different from seizures which may happen when one is awake. However, due to the context in which they may occur it is advisable to avoid soft pillows which can cause breathing to be obstructed if the person turns their face into the pillow during the seizure.

Tap2Tag Wristband (€25)

The Tap2Tag medical alert wristband uses NFC technology to allow paramedics and other health professionals get access to your medical information quickly and efficiently. Please note this is not an Epilepsy Ireland product, and the accessibillity  of obtaining the relevant medical data  quickly could potentially depend on a paramedic/first responder knowing what to do on seeing the wristband