Latest on Epilepsy

13-10-09 Why do people get epilepsy?

13 October 2009
print version share on facebook

Why do people get epilepsy? Why does epilepsy gets worse? Why do people have neuropathic pain?

A Duke University Medical Center researcher who spent years looking for the signals that prompt the brain to form new connections between neurons has found one that may answer these questions and explain precisely how a well-known drug for epilepsy and pain actually works.

The finding may also point to new therapies for brain injury and neuropathic pain.

The role of neurons in the brain and nervous system is well known, but astrocytes, a different type of brain cell, still are largely a mystery. Duke scientist Cagla Eroglu, Ph.D. has discovered a receptor that receives messages from astrocytes so that the brain can form excitatory synapses, the cell-to-cell connections that can become overactive in conditions such as epilepsy. Working with a team of scientists from other institutions, Eroglu found this receptor is also blocked by the anti-convulsant drug gabapentin (Neurontin™).

"The study links astrocytes and their role in synapse formation to diseases, so if the normal process goes wrong, this may explain why people get epilepsy, why epilepsy gets worse, or why they have neuropathic pain," said Eroglu, assistant professor in the Duke Department of Cell Biology. "It's a fine balance, because synapse formation has to occur during development for neurons to transmit brain signals, but if this happens in an uncontrolled manner in the adult brain, it could lead to these debilitating conditions."

The study appears online in the latest issue of Cell.
 

web design by ionic