11-04-2018| Largest study to date of structural brain abnormalities in epilepsy

11 April 2018
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An international research consortium, which included The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), used neuroimaging techniques to analyze the brains of more than 3,800 volunteers in different countries. The largest study of its type ever conducted set out to investigate anatomical similarities and differences in the brains of individuals with different types of epilepsy and to seek markers that could help with prognosis and treatment.

Epilepsy's seizure frequency and severity, as well as the patient's response to drug therapy, vary with the part of the brain affected and other poorly understood factors. Data from the scientific literature suggests that roughly one-third of patients do not respond well to anti-epileptic drugs. Research has shown that these individuals are more likely to develop cognitive and behavioral impairments over the years.

The new study was conducted by a specific working group within an international consortium called ENIGMA, short for Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis, established to investigate several neurological and psychiatric diseases. Twenty-four cross-sectional samples from 14 countries were included in the epilepsy study.

Altogether, the study included data for 2,149 people with epilepsy and 1,727 healthy control subjects (with no neurological or psychiatric disorders).

"Each center was responsible for collecting and analyzing data on its own patients. All the material was then sent to the University of Southern California's Imaging Genetics Center in the US, which consolidated the results and performed a meta-analysis," said Fernando Cendes, a professor at UNICAMP and coordinator of The Brazilian Research Institute for Neuroscience and Neurotechnology (BRAINN).

Significance for the future 

From the vantage point of the coordinator for the FAPESP-funded center, the findings published in the article will benefit research in the area and will also have future implications for the diagnosis of the disease. In parallel with their anatomical analysis, the group is also evaluating genetic alterations that may explain certain hereditary patterns in brain atrophy. The results of this genetic analysis will be published soon.

"If we know there are more or less specific signatures of the different epileptic subtypes, instead of looking for alterations everywhere in the brain, we can focus on suspect regions, reducing cost, saving time and bolstering the statistical power of the analysis. Next, we'll be able to correlate these alterations with cognitive and behavioral dysfunction," Cendes said.

Article source: EurekAlert

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